Building Brands Through Architectural Photography

Posted on Sep 20, 2016

Building Brands With Architectural Photography | eimageWe’ve been in the business of architectural photography for decades – 25 years at this stage – and each project is different. It’s not simply a case of taking photos of a building, although that’s what it may seem like. Each project has it’s own unique attributes and it’s essential that we convey these requirements in the pictures that we take. We need to bring buildings to life through photography and to do this, there are certain elements for each project that will make or break it.

The Photography Brief

When we get a brief for an architectural photography project, it can come from a range of different sources. Generally speaking, it’s the architects and property owners who are looking for multiple angles of a building that will showcase it’s beauty and personality. Yes, even buildings have personality. When you think of property owners wanting to sell a house, they want to sell the experience of living in that home, and the only way to do this is to capture the essence of that building that has seen countless birthday parties, romantic dinners, family movie nights and soccer games in the garden. Each photograph taken needs to tell one of those stories to help prospective home owners visualise themselves in that living space.

Architects usually deliver briefs that require us to highlight certain features of a building. Perhaps it’s certain engineering feats that set this structure aside from all the others on the block? The best way to do this is to choose the moment of capture very carefully. You’ve all heard about the “golden hour” and it’s a very real and exciting moment in any photographer’s day. This is usually just after the sun has set or an hour or so before sunrise. These are the minutes of the day where we can make magic happen!

We often receive more commercial focussed photography briefs that require us to depict the hustle and bustle of a shopping centre or public place. In order to showcase the popularity of a certain venue, we want to be there when it’s busiest so that we can capture people enjoying their time within this space. Again it’s all about personality and presence. These photographs are generally less focussed on beautiful lighting, but more on activity, so we need to find a way to bring this forward while still making each finished product captivating. But, if we can combine the activity with magnificent light, we’ve won!

There’s so much more to any kind of photography than simply getting the composition right. It most certainly is an art form. Have a look at some of the projects we’ve worked on in the area of architecture photography.